Statistics South Africa - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/295 The South Africa I Know, The Home I Understand Thu, 22 Mar 2018 10:59:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/975/?v=4.6 Stats SA to release Mortality and causes of death report and the Quartely employment Statistics Q4 of 2017 - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/492/?p=11025 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/969/?p=11025#respond Thu, 22 Mar 2018 10:59:24 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/066/?p=11025 read more »
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MEDIA INVITE???????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????????????????????????????22 March 2018

Stats SA to release Mortality and causes of death report and the Quartely employment Statistics Q4 of 2017

The Statistician-General of South Africa, Risenga Maluleke, will release the Mortality and causes of death in South Africa, 2016 report ?and Quarterly employment statistics Q4 of 2017 at a media briefing to be held on Tuesday, 27 March 2018 in Pretoria.

The Mortality and causes of death report provides an overview of what South Africans die from, and highlights variations by age sex and geographic location such as provinces and districts. Deaths occurrences related to communicable and non-communicable disease as well as the number of deaths resulting from the ten leading underlying cause will also be outlined.

The Quarterly Employment Statistics (QES) measures changes in employment across all industries in the formal sector of the economy. It collects data from value-added tax (VAT)-registered businesses (excluding agriculture). The survey also provides earnings data (such as salaries, wages, overtime and bonuses) by industry, and the change in average earning received by employees in the formal sector of the economy.

The media briefing will be held as follows:

Date: 27 March 2018

Time: 10:30

Venue: (Ronnie Mamoepa Media Centre, Tshedimosetso House, Cnr Francis Baard & Festival streets, Hatfield, Pretoria).

(NB! There will be a video link to Imbizo Media Centre, 120 Plein Street, Parliament, Cape Town)

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RSVP:

Felicia Sithole Tel: (012) 339 2401 Cell: 0764300693 E-mail Felicias@statssa.gov.za

Gift Madiega Tel: 012 337 3404 Cell: 073 248 1083 Email: GiftMad@statssa.gov.za

 

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?Media Enquiries:

Ms Lesedi Dibakwane

Tel: (012) 310 8578

Cell: 082 805 7088

lesedid@statssa.gov.za

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Issued by Statistics South Africa

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Stats SA to release the Tourism satellite account (TSA) report - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/383/?p=11020 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/217/?p=11020#respond Thu, 22 Mar 2018 10:52:30 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/196/?p=11020 read more »
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MEDIA INVITE???????????????????????????????????????????????? ??????????????????????????????22 March 2018

Stats SA ?to release the Tourism satellite account (TSA) report

The Statistician-General of South Africa, Risenga Maluleke, will release the Tourism satellite report (TSA) at a media briefing to be held on Monday, 26 March 2018 in Pretoria. The TSA report provides an overview of the role that tourism plays in South Africa and also information on the contribution by tourism sector to the economy in terms of expenditure and employment.

The media briefing will be held as follows:

?Date: 26 March 2018

Time: 12H00

Venue: (Ronnie Mamoepa Media Centre, Tshedimosetso House, Cnr Francis Baard & Festival streets, Hatfield, Pretoria)

(NB! There will be a video link to Imbizo Media Centre, 120 Plein Street, Parliament, Cape Town)

RSVP:

Felicia Sithole Tel: (012) 339 2401 Cell: 0764300693 E-mail Felicias@statssa.gov.za

Gift Madiega Tel: 012 337 3404 Cell: 073 248 1083 Email: GiftMad@statssa.gov.za

 

Media Enquiries:

Ms Lesedi Dibakwane

Tel: (012) 310 8578

Cell: 082 805 7088

lesedid@statssa.gov.za

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Issued by Statistics South Africa

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Stats SA to ensure VAT change reflected in - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/635/?p=11014 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/137/?p=11014#respond Mon, 19 Mar 2018 10:21:14 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/860/?p=11014 read more »
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MEDIA RELEASE

19 March 2018

Stats SA to ensure VAT change reflected in CPI

The VAT increase to 15% on 1 April will affect the price of many of the items in the Consumer price index (CPI) basket. Retailers and service providers may adopt different approaches and timeframes to pass this increase onto their customers. Stats SA surveys actual prices during the compilation of the CPI, irrespective of how these prices were determined.

Not all products in the CPI basket are surveyed every month. This is because prices for many products and services do not usually change every month and spreading the collection assists in managing the workload of the price collection team. A schedule of periodic collections is shown in each monthly CPI release. It has always been Stats SA’s policy to conduct additional surveys when we become aware of unscheduled price changes.

Stats SA will undertake additional surveys in April and May and make automatic adjustments to selected prices to capture as much of the impact of the VAT increase as possible.

  1. Automatic adjustments will be made to the municipal tariffs to account for the increase in VAT.
  1. Special surveys of the following categories will be made:
    • Short-term insurance will be surveyed in April and May 2018 and then according to the regular schedule;
    • Private medical practitioners and hospital costs will be surveyed between April and October 2018 and then in February 2019 according to the normal schedule;
    • Toll fees will be surveyed in April or May (instead of March) depending on the timing of implementing new tariffs.

As Stats SA obtains information from additional service providers, further products may be surveyed or adjusted.

Zero-rated and VAT-exempt items comprise 43,5% of the headline CPI basket which includes 5,5% of food expenditures. A detailed list of the products and their weight in the headline CPI is available on the Stats SA website (www.statssa.gov.za/?page_id=2528).

 

Weight (out of 100) of headline CPI basket items zero-rated for VAT or exempt from VAT

Product group Weight (%)
?Food and non alcoholic beverages ?????? 5.46
?Housing and utilities ???? 18.84
?Household contents and services ?????? 2.43
?Transport ?????? 6.33
?Education ?????? 2.52
?Miscellaneous goods and services ?????? 7.93
?Total ???? 43.51

 

For media enquiries contact:
Lesedi Dibakwane

012?310 8578

082 805 7088

LesediD@statssa.gov.za

 

For further information please contact:

Marietjie Bennett   Patrick Kelly
012?310 8077   012?310 8290
082?888 2194   082?888 2248
Marietjieb@statssa.gov.za   Patrickke@statssa.gov.za

 

 

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Mbalo Brief – March 2018 - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/689/?p=11003 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/660/?p=11003#respond Thu, 15 Mar 2018 12:25:53 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/234/?p=11003 read more »
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South Africa will host 10th Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) Summit which is scheduled from 25 to 27 July 2018. The 2018 Summit will be an important milestone for BRICS cooperation, as it represents a decade of BRICS cooperation at the highest diplomatic level. The summit will see South Africa building on the programme of development and prosperity for partner countries. The official BRICS Summit website www.BRICS2018.org.za was launched as the first point of contact for the latest information on the Summit for both domestic and international users. This will include, amongst others, information about BRICS, the member countries, the host country and province, logistics and side events.

 
In this month’s issue of Mbalo Brief, our educational article is based on the Early Childhood Development, derived from the Education Series Volume IV: Early Childhood Development in South Africa, 2016. Also have a look at our monthly crossword puzzle and solutions for February 2018 puzzle.

 
Articles published in this issue are based on results of industry surveys conducted for the months ranging from December 2017 to January 2018.

Download Stats Biz – January 2018

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Economic growth better than what many expected - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/992/?p=10985 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/971/?p=10985#respond Tue, 06 Mar 2018 09:30:32 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/817/?p=10985 read more »
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In a time when good news seems hard to come by, the latest gross domestic product (GDP) results provide some cautious cheer.

The South African economy grew by 1,3% in 2017, exceeding National Treasury’s expectation of 1,0% growth announced during the National Budget Speech in February.

graph

After a wobbly start to 2017, which saw economic activity contract in the first quarter, the economy saw sustained growth for the remainder of the year. The fourth quarter experienced the highest growth rate of 2017, with the economy expanding by 3,1% quarter-on-quarter (seasonally adjusted and annualised).

The strengthening in economic activity over 2017 was partly driven by an agriculture industry bouncing back from one of the worst droughts in recent history. A bumper maize crop and recovery in other agricultural commodities saw agriculture production rise by 17,7% in 2017 compared with 2016.

image

The finance and mining industries also contributed positively to GDP growth in 2017. Mining’s growth was spurred on, in part, by increased production of manganese ore, chrome, and iron ore, according to a recent article by Stats SA.1 Rising demand for minerals used in the production of steel contributed to these increases.

Focussing specifically on the fourth quarter of 2017, a rise in the production of animal products saw the agriculture industry continue its buoyant performance, recording a 37,5% quarter-on-quarter rise in production.

Image1

The trade sector was the second largest contributor to economic growth in the fourth quarter, mostly a result of a rise in activities related to retail, wholesale and motor trade.

The 4,3% rise in manufacturing was largely driven by increased production of products in food and beverages, petroleum, and basic iron and steel.

Despite mining’s increase for the year as a whole, the industry saw a quarter-on-quarter decline in the fourth quarter, largely driven by a fall in the production of gold and platinum group metals (PGMs).

With South African economic growth having exceeded expectations in 2017, all eyes are now on 2018. National Treasury expects growth of 1,5% in 2018. Only time will tell how the economy will fare compared with this forecast.

 

Key facts from the fourth quarter 2017 GDP release:

  • Real GDP was up 3,1% quarter-on-quarter (seasonally adjusted and annualised).
  • Unadjusted real GDP was up by 1,5% year-on-year.
  • The South African economy grew by 1,3% in 2017 compared with 2016.
  • Nominal GDP in the fourth quarter was estimated at R1,21 trillion (for the whole of 2017 the estimate is R4,65 trillion).
  • Expenditure on GDP grew by 3,1% in the fourth quarter, with positive contributions to growth coming from consumption, investment and net exports.

Download the latest GDP release and media presentation here.

1 Mining: winners and losers in 2017 (read here).

 

 

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Statistician-General to release Gross domestic product (GDP), Q4 2017 - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/163/?p=10976 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/057/?p=10976#respond Fri, 02 Mar 2018 13:30:46 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/859/?p=10976 read more »
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MEDIA INVITE? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?02 March 2018

The Statistician-General of South Africa, Mr Risenga Maluleke, will release the Gross domestic product (GDP) estimates for the fourth quarter of 2017 at a media briefing to be held on Tuesday, 6 March 2018 in Pretoria.

The media briefing will be held as follows:

Date: 6 March 2018

Lockup: 11H00

Embargo: 11h30

Venue: (Ronnie Mamoepa Media Centre, Tshedimosetso House, Cnr Francis Baard & Festival streets, Hatfield, Pretoria)

(NB! There will be a video link to Imbizo Media Centre, 120 Plein Street, Parliament, Cape Town)

RSVP:

Felicia Sithole Tel: (012) 339 2401 Cell: 0764300693 E-mail Felicias@statssa.gov.za

Gift Madiega Tel: 012 337 3404 Cell: 073 248 1083 Email: GiftMad@statssa.gov.za

Media Enquiries:

Ms Lesedi Dibakwane

Tel: (012) 310 8578

Cell: 082 805 7088

lesedid@statssa.gov.za

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Issued by Statistics South Africa

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Stats Biz – February 2018 - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/609/?p=10970 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/596/?p=10970#respond Thu, 01 Mar 2018 12:30:59 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/008/?p=10970 read more »
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You’ve got no one to blame except yourself. Admit it. You totally forgot about Valentine’s Day. And now you’ve got to come up with something fast! Fancy a candlelit dinner at a restaurant? Or a basket containing chocolate and wine? Stats SA takes a look at the prices of gifts that will warm the heart of your significant other. Explore Valentine’s Day, as well as other stories, in this edition of Stats Biz.

Download Stats Biz – February 2018

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Mining: winners and losers of 2017 - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/679/?p=10963 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/682/?p=10963#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 11:37:18 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/545/?p=10963 read more »
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The 2017 Mining Charter published by government in June has seen its fair share of debate, opening intense discussions on the industry’s future. Outside of this policy debate, Stats SA recently published figures showing how the industry performed in 2016 and 2017.

2016 wasn’t a good year for South African mining. The industry as a whole saw a decline of 4,0% that year, the largest annual fall in production since the global recession of 2009. Only one mineral managed to keep its head above water: diamond production recorded positive growth of just under 1%. All other minerals found themselves in negative territory in 2016, with copper the worst performer, recording a 16% fall in production.

Manganese and diamonds shine in 2017

The industry fared much better in 2017 on the back of higher mineral prices and increased global demand. Production was up by 4,0% last year1, bringing some relief to the embattled industry.

Manganese ore was the star of 2017, with production of the metal rising by 32%. Diamond mining, the sole performer of 2016, had an even better 2017, placing it as the second most successful mineral after manganese (up 17%).

Rising demand in China for steel was the main driver behind the rise in manganese production. Chromium and iron ore, two other minerals used in the production of steel (in the case of chromium, stainless steel), were the third and fourth best performing minerals in 2017.

Gold continues to fall

Stats SA has previously highlighted the extent to which gold mining has lost ground over the last three decades.2 The precious metal continued its production decline, slipping by 3,7% in 2017. The annual production index for gold is now 46% lower than it was in 2007.

In fact, South African gold production has experienced only four years of positive growth since 1990: these were in 1992, 1993, 2002 and 2013. All other years saw a decline, with the largest annual fall occurring in 2008 (-16%).

Employment has been the obvious victim. Just over two in every three gold mining jobs in 1995 no longer exist. Gold mining employed about 380?000 people in 1995, according to Stats SA’s Environmental Economic Accounts Compendium report3, falling to about 119?000 people in 2014.

Despite the fall in production, gold still finds itself in the top three in terms of the value of sales. South African mineral sales were dominated by coal (28%) and platinum group metals (21%) in 2017, followed by gold (15%). However, with estimates that South Africa has 39 years of accessible gold reserves remaining4, it remains to be seen how long gold will hold onto this position.

Why is mining still important?

Mining as a whole is still an important player in the South African economy. The industry contributes R8 for every R100 produced by the national economy5 and employs one in every 40 working individuals (or 2,5% of the entire workforce).6

These figures might not sound that impressive at a glance, until you consider that mining is more important to some regions than others. Mining is the largest industry in four of South Africa’s nine provinces: North West, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Northern Cape.7 In particular, mining contributed R33 for every R100 produced by North West’s economy in 20158,? and the industry employed one in every 6 working individuals (or 16% of the provincial workforce).9

Updated provincial GDP estimates will be published on 6 March 2018, providing a fresh picture of mining’s influence in each province, as well as for the country as a whole.10

Whatever the outcome of renewed deliberations around the future of South African mining, efforts to ensure a sustained growth path are vital to the livelihoods of communities that depend on this industry.

Infographic_v04

1 Download the December 2017 release of Mining: Production and sales here.

2 The decreasing importance of gold mining in South Africa (read here).

3 Environment economic accounts compendium, 2017, Table 4.9 (download here). More information on jobs in the mining industry can be found here.

4 Environment economic accounts compendium, 2017, Table 3.6 (download here).

5 GDP Q3 2017 media presentation, Slide 12 (download here).

6 Quarterly Labour Force Survey, Quarter 4, 2017, Table B (download here)

7 Your job, your economy, your province (read here)

8 GDP Q4 2016 media presentation, Slide 48 (download here).

9 Labour Market Dynamics, 2015 (figures extracted from SuperWEB).

10 GDP Q4 2017 figures will be published here.

 

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Education Series Volume IV: Early Childhood Development in South Africa, 2016 - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/459/?p=10957 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/152/?p=10957#respond Tue, 27 Feb 2018 12:50:57 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/576/?p=10957 read more »
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MEDIA RELEASE? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 27 February 2018

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? ?Education Series Volume IV: Early Childhood Development in South Africa, 2016

 

The Early Childhood Development (ECD) report released by Statistics South Africa today shows that of the nearly 8, 2 million children aged 0–6 who according to the Mid-Year population Estimates lived in South Africa in 2016, almost half 46% were living in households belonging to the lower household income quintiles (quintiles 1 and 2). A breakdown by monthly household income quintile revealed that close to half of the children in the lower household income quintile did not attend educational facilities, while 40% of the children in the highest household income quintile attended ECD facilities. The ECD report which is based on the findings of the General Household Survey (GHS) 2016, further shows that 48% of these children lived in single parent family structures where ?46% were residing with only their mothers, and 2% with their fathers only, while 12% lived with none of their biological parents. Close to 36% of children aged six or younger belonged to large households with more than six members; about 6% stayed in one-roomed dwellings and around 10% lived in dwellings which had no bedrooms.

 

According to the report, the majority of households in traditional and traditional areas had a disproportionately large burden of care for young children by grandparents and other family members. A large percentage of children were growing up in home environments that did not provide for communication or play to stimulate learning. Children in black African families were never encouraged to imitate daily activities 31% and 35% were never given answers when they pointed at objects and asked for explanations.

 

Most young children lived in households with poor access to piped water and improved sanitation. Only approximately 35% in Eastern Cape and 46% in Limpopo had access to piped water inside their dwellings or on site. In contrast, young children in Gauteng and Western Cape lived in households with nearly universal access to piped water inside their dwellings or on site (94% and 89% respectively). Only 57% of children in Limpopo had access to improved sanitation. One in ten of young children stayed in dwellings with poorly constructed roofs or walls. The worst cases were experienced by children in Western Cape with 17% of children living in dwellings with weak walls and 18% with weak roofs.

 

There was an increase in the percentage of children accessing the essential components of the ECD. ?The most significant increase occurred in infant breastfeeding with 73% of children under the age of one year being breastfed in 2016 while also consuming other food and 32% infants being exclusively breastfed.

 

Overall half of children between 12 to 59 months received vitamin A supplement. Approximately a third of children in Gauteng and Free State were stunted (34, 2% and 33, 5% respectively). In 2016, according to the Department of Health data, South Africa also had one of the highest low birth weight rate with 13, 3% occurrences of live births of babies under 2,5kg nationally. The country also had a high underweight-for-age incidence among children under two years old with 21% occurrences nationally in 2016 according to data from the Department of Health.

 

While child mortality has declined over the years, under five mortality rates were still relatively high at 44 child deaths per 1 000 live births in 2016. These deaths mostly occurred during the perinatal periods and were caused by respiratory and cardiovascular disorders. Close to 61% of children less than one year of age had been immunised with all basic vaccinations. The incidence of pneumonia in children under 5 was 34%.

 

The percentage of pregnant women who made their first antenatal visit before 20 weeks was 61%. Overall in 2016, close to 76% of mothers returned to the facilities for their sixth day check-up. Two out of three births (66%) that occurred in South Africa took place at a health facility. The percentage of late birth registrations decreased from 12, 9% in 2010 to 3,4% in 2015. By March 2017, 4 931 544 children aged 0–6 had access to a child support grant. Out of these 9, 2% were one year old or less; the rest of the beneficiaries were aged 2–6 years.

 

For technical enquiries contact:

 

Ms Gwen Lehloenya

Acting Deputy Director-General: Population and Social Statistics

Tel: 012 310 9324

Email: GwenL@statssa.gov.za

 

 

Dr Isabelle Schmidt

Chief Director: Social Statistics

Tel: 012 310 6379

Email: Isabels@statssa.gov.za

 

Dr Seble Worku

Director: Education Statistics

Tel: 012 310 8480

Email: Seblew@statssa.gov.za

 

 

 

For media enquiries contact:

Ms Lesedi Dibakwane

Tel: 012 310 8578

Cell: 082 805 7088

Email: LesediD@statssa.gov.za

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Issued by Statistics South Africa

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Investing in early childhood development is the future - ●北京赛车助赢 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/733/?p=10950 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/508/?p=10950#respond Tue, 27 Feb 2018 09:59:23 +0000 http://www.ihtx.com.cn/101/?p=10950 read more »
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Investing in early childhood development is the future

“If we are to break the cycle of poverty, we need to educate the children of the poor.” – President Cyril Ramaphosa, SoNA 2018

The first one thousand days in a child’s life could hold the key to unlocking his/her life-long potential. By the age of 5, almost 90% of a child’s brain will be developed. These are the formative years where factors such as adequate healthcare, good nutrition, good quality childcare and nurturing, a clean and safe environment, early learning and stimulation will, to a large extent, influence his/her future as an adult.

 

According to a new report released by Statistics South Africa based on the findings of the General Household Survey data, Early Childhood Development in South Africa, 2016, there were close to 7,2 million children aged 0–6 in South Africa[1] in 2016. The report focuses on the latest evidence in early childhood development of children aged 0–6.

 

Development of a child begins as early as the start of a woman’s pregnancy, and good nutrition and medical care for the mother is therefore essential in order for her to deliver a healthy child. During the period of 2015–2016, 61% of pregnant women made their first antenatal visit before 20 weeks and the antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage for pregnant women was 93%. This intervention has had a significant impact on ensuring that children born to HIV-positive women stay HIV negative and healthy. Close to 35% of pregnant women stayed in households that ran out of money to buy food for five or more days in the 30 days prior to the survey.

 

Efforts to encourage mothers to breastfeed have yielded positive results. The report shows that in 2016 close to 73% of children aged less than one year were breastfed, while 32% among the same age group were exclusively breastfed. Breastfeeding remains the most nutritious, affordable and safe feeding option for young children.

 

In spite of these gains, malnutrition remains a serious challenge in South Africa. Approximately a third of children in Gauteng and Free State were stunted as a result of chronic malnutrition. South Africa also had one of the highest low-birth-weight rates with a 13,3% occurrence of live births of babies under 2,5kg nationally. The country also had a high underweight-for-age incidence with 21,3% occurrences nationally in 2016.

 

These disorders often lead to child deaths; in 2016, the rate of deaths associated with severe acute malnutrition among children younger than five was eight per cent. Inadequate prenatal care and poor child feeding practices contributed to high early-childhood-mortality levels. Nationally in South Africa, the under-five mortality rate and the infant mortality rate were 44 and 34 deaths per 1 000 live births, respectively.

 

The environment in which children grow up also plays a role in their cognitive and psychosocial development. Activities that involve playing, singing or reading and that stimulate the brain through all the senses can help improve their ability to think and communicate. Children living in poor households, where parents are less able to spend time or money to feed and educate them, may grow up in a less stimulating home environment. A breakdown by monthly household income quintile revealed that close to half of the children in the lower household income quintiles did not attend any educational centre, while 40% of the children in the highest household income quintile attended out-of-home early learning programmes. Children in mostly black African families received suboptimal stimulation as 31% were never encouraged to imitate daily activities and 35,2% were never given answers when they pointed at objects and asked for explanations.

 

Children in poor households may thus start life at a disadvantage and can fall further behind their more advantaged peers throughout their lifecycle.

 

For the full report, click here.

北京赛车助赢 Note: Due to the differences in methodology used, mid-year population estimates are higher than population estimates produced from household surveys

ECD INFOGRAPHIC 2 March 2018

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